Two nurses, a carpenter, and those they left behind: Families of fallen frontliners cope, still need support

As the world hopes to welcome a new year with a lessened threat of the coronavirus, the families of fallen COVID-19 frontliners are still learning to cope with their losses. And with news of vaccines passing clinical tests, Melody Buenconsejo, a 38-year-old mother of four, hopes that her children can soon return to school to fulfill their dreams — which their father will never be able to see.

Her husband Manuel succumbed to the disease while working as a carpenter in the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine in Muntinlupa City last July. Manuel lost his life on the morning of July 9 after developing a dry cough and fever, which are both telltale symptoms of COVID-19. While Me…

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